2022 Cybersecurity Alerts

Google Releases Security Updates for Chrome
May 25, 2022

Google has released Chrome version 102.0.5005.61 for Windows, Mac, and Linux. This version addresses vulnerabilities that an attacker could exploit to take control of an affected system.

CISA encourages users and administrators to review the Chrome Release Note and apply the necessary update.


CISA Adds 34 Known Exploited Vulnerabilities to Catalog
May 25, 2022

CISA has added 34 new vulnerabilities to its Known Exploited Vulnerabilities Catalog, based on evidence of active exploitation. These types of vulnerabilities are a frequent attack vector for malicious cyber actors and pose significant risk to the federal enterprise. Note: to view the newly added vulnerabilities in the catalog, click on the arrow on the of the “Date Added to Catalog” column, which will sort by descending dates.

Binding Operational Directive (BOD) 22-01: Reducing the Significant Risk of Known Exploited Vulnerabilities established the Known Exploited Vulnerabilities Catalog as a living list of known CVEs that carry significant risk to the federal enterprise. BOD 22-01 requires FCEB agencies to remediate identified vulnerabilities by the due date to protect FCEB networks against active threats. See the BOD 22-01 Fact Sheet for more information.

Although BOD 22-01 only applies to FCEB agencies, CISA strongly urges all organizations to reduce their exposure to cyberattacks by prioritizing timely remediation of Catalog vulnerabilities as part of their vulnerability management practice. CISA will continue to add vulnerabilities to the Catalog that meet the meet the specified criteria.


CISA Adds 20 Known Exploited Vulnerabilities to Catalog
May 24, 2022

CISA has added 20 new vulnerabilities to its Known Exploited Vulnerabilities Catalog, based on evidence of active exploitation. These types of vulnerabilities are a frequent attack vector for malicious cyber actors and pose significant risk to the federal enterprise. Note: to view the newly added vulnerabilities in the catalog, click on the arrow on the of the “Date Added to Catalog” column, which will sort by descending dates.

Binding Operational Directive (BOD) 22-01: Reducing the Significant Risk of Known Exploited Vulnerabilities established the Known Exploited Vulnerabilities Catalog as a living list of known CVEs that carry significant risk to the federal enterprise. BOD 22-01 requires FCEB agencies to remediate identified vulnerabilities by the due date to protect FCEB networks against active threats. See the BOD 22-01 Fact Sheet for more information.

Although BOD 22-01 only applies to FCEB agencies, CISA strongly urges all organizations to reduce their exposure to cyberattacks by prioritizing timely remediation of Catalog vulnerabilities as part of their vulnerability management practice. CISA will continue to add vulnerabilities to the Catalog that meet the meet the specified criteria.


Mozilla Releases Security Products for Multiple Firefox Products
May 23, 2022

Mozilla has released security updates to address vulnerabilities in Firefox 100.0.2, Firefox for Android 100.3.0, and Firefox ESR 91.9.1. An attacker could exploit these vulnerabilities to take control of an affected system.

CISA encourages users and administrators to review Mozilla security advisory MFSA 2022-19 and apply the necessary updates.


ISC Releases Security Advisory for BIND
May 19, 2022

The Internet Systems Consortium (ISC) has released a security advisory that addresses a vulnerability affecting version 9.18.0 of ISC Berkeley Internet Name Domain (BIND). A remote attacker could exploit this vulnerability to cause a denial-of-service condition.

CISA encourages users and administrators to review the ISC advisory for CVE-2022-1183 and apply the necessary update.


CISA Releases Analysis of FY21 Risk and Vulnerability Assessments
May 19, 2022

CISA has released an analysis and infographic detailing the findings from the 112 Risk and Vulnerability Assessments (RVAs) conducted across multiple sectors in Fiscal Year 2021 (FY21).

The analysis details a sample attack path comprising 11 successive tactics, or steps, a cyber threat actor could take to compromise an organization with weaknesses that are representative of those CISA observed in FY21 RVAs. The infographic highlights the three most successful techniques for each tactic that the RVAs documented. Both the analysis and the infographic map threat actor behavior to the MITRE ATT&CK® framework.

CISA encourages network defenders to review the analysis and infographic and apply the recommended mitigations to protect against the observed tactics and techniques. For information on CISA RVAs and additional services, visit the CISA Cyber Resource Hub.


CISA Issues Emergency Directive and Releases Advisory Related to VMware Vulnerabilities
May 18, 2022

CISA has issued Emergency Directive (ED) 22-03 and released a Cybersecurity Advisory (CSA) in response to active and expected exploitation of multiple vulnerabilities in the following VMware products: VMware Workspace ONE Access (Access), VMware Identity Manager (vIDM), VMware vRealize Automation (vRA), VMware Cloud Foundation, vRealize Suite Lifecycle Manager.

The CSA, AA22-138B: Threat Actors Chaining Unpatched VMware Vulnerabilities for Full System Control, provides indicators of compromise and detection signatures from CISA as well as trusted third parties to assist administrators with detecting and responding to active exploitation of CVE-2022-22954 and CVE-2022-22960.  Malicious cyber actors were able to reverse engineer the vendor updates to develop an exploit within 48 hours and quickly began exploiting these disclosed vulnerabilities in unpatched devices. Based on this activity, CISA expects malicious cyber actors to quickly develop a capability to exploit CVE-2022-22972 and CVE-2022-22973, which were disclosed by VMware on May 18, 2022.

ED 22-03 directs all Federal Civilian Executive Branch agencies to enumerate all instances of affected VMware products and either deploy updates provided in VMware Security Advisory VMSA-2022-0014, released May 18, 2022, or remove those instances from agency networks.

CISA strongly encourages all organizations to deploy updates provided in VMware Security Advisory VMSA-2022-0014 or remove those instances from networks. CISA also encourages organizations with affected VMware products that are accessible from the internet to assume compromise and initiate threat hunting activities using the detection methods provided in the CSA. If potential compromise is detected, administrators should apply the incident response recommendations included in the CSA.


Threat Actors Exploiting F5 BIG IP CVE-2022-1388
May 18, 2022

CISA and the Multi-State Information Sharing and Analysis Center (MS-ISAC) have released the joint Cybersecurity Advisory Threat Actors Exploiting F5 BIG-IP CVE-2022-1388 in response to active exploitation of CVE-2022-1388, which affects F5 Networks BIG-IP devices. The vulnerability allows an unauthenticated actor to gain control of affected systems via the management port or self-IP addresses.

CISA encourages users and administrators to review the joint advisory for detection methods and mitigations, which include updating F5 BIG-IP software, or, if unable to immediately update, applying temporary workarounds.


Apple Releases Security Updates for Multiple Products
May 17, 2022

Apple has released security updates to address vulnerabilities in multiple products. An attacker could exploit some of these vulnerabilities to take control of an affected system. Note: Apple notes they are aware of a report that states CVE-2022-22675 may have been actively exploited. CVE-2022-22675 affects watchOS, tvOS, and macOS Big Sur.

CISA encourages users and administrators to review the Apple security pages for the following products and apply the necessary updates.


Weak Security Controls and Practices Routinely Exploited for Initial Access
May 17, 2022

The cybersecurity authorities of the United States, Canada, New Zealand, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom have issued a joint Cybersecurity Advisory (CSA) on 10 routinely exploited weak security controls, poor configurations, and bad practices that allow malicious actors to compromise networks. While these poor practices may be common, organizations can apply basic practices, such as the following, to help protect their systems:

  • Control access.
  • Harden credentials.
  • Establish centralized log management.
  • Use antivirus solutions.
  • Employ detection tools.
  • Operate services exposed on internet-accessible hosts with secure configurations.
  • Keep software updated.

Apache Releases Security Advisory for Tomcat
May 16, 2022

The Apache Software Foundation has released a security advisory to address a vulnerability in multiple versions of Tomcat. An attacker could exploit this vulnerability to obtain sensitive information.

CISA encourages users and administrators to review Apache’s security advisory and apply the necessary updates.


CISA Temporarily Removes CVE-2022-26925 from Known Exploited Vulnerability Catalog
May 13, 2022

CISA is temporarily removing CVE-2022-26925 from its Known Exploited Vulnerability Catalog due to a risk of authentication failures when the May 10, 2022 Microsoft rollup update is applied to domain controllers. After installing May 10, 2022 rollup update on domain controllers, organizations might experience authentication failures on the server or client for services, such as Network Policy Server (NPS), Routing and Remote access Service (RRAS), Radius, Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP), and Protected Extensible Authentication Protocol (PEAP). Microsoft notified CISA of this issue, which is related to how the mapping of certificates to machine accounts is being handled by the domain controller.

For more information see the Microsoft Knowledge Base article, KB5014754—Certificate-based authentication changes on Windows domain controllers: Key Distribution Center registry key.

Note: installation of updates released May 10, 2022, on client Windows devices and non-domain controller Windows Servers will not cause this issue and is still strongly encouraged. This issue only affects May 10, 2022 updates installed on servers used as domain controllers. Organizations should continue to apply updates to client Windows devices and non-domain controller Windows Servers.


Adobe Releases Security Updates for Multiple Products
May 12, 2022

Adobe has released security updates to address vulnerabilities in multiple products. An attacker could exploit some of these vulnerabilities to take control of an affected system.

CISA encourages users and administrators to review the following Adobe Security Bulletins and apply the necessary updates.

•    Character Animator APSB22-21
•    ColdFusion APSB22-22
•    InDesign APSB22-23
•    Framemaker APSB22-27
•    InCopy APSB22-28


May 12, 2022

Google has released Chrome version 101.0.4951.64 for Windows, Mac, and Linux. This version addresses vulnerabilities that an attacker could exploit to take control of an affected system.CISA encourages users and administrators to review the Chrome Release Note and apply the necessary update.


May 11, 2022
The cybersecurity authorities of the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United States have released joint Cybersecurity Advisory (CSA), Protecting Against Cyber Threats to Managed Service Providers and their Customers, to provide guidance on how to protect against malicious cyber activity targeting managed service providers (MSPs) and their customers. The CSA—created in response to reports of increased activity against MSPs and their customers—provides specific guidance for both MSPs and customers aimed at enabling transparent discussions on securing sensitive data. The CSA also provides tactical actions for MSPs and customers, including:
  • Identify and disable accounts that are no longer in use.
  • Enforce MFA on MSP accounts that access the customer environment and monitor for unexplained failed authentication.
  • Ensure MSP-customer contracts transparently identify ownership of information and communications technology (ICT) security roles and responsibilities.

CISA urges organizations to review the joint CSA and take actions to strengthen their defenses against malicious cyber activity.


Microsoft Releases May 2022 Security Updates 
May 11, 2022

Microsoft has released updates to address multiple vulnerabilities in Microsoft software. An attacker can exploit some of these vulnerabilities to take control of an affected system.

CISA encourages users and administrators to review Microsoft’s May 2022 Security Update
Summary
 and Deployment Information and apply the necessary updates.


CISA Adds One Known Exploited Vulnerability to Catalog
May 11, 2022

CISA has added one new vulnerability to its Known Exploited Vulnerabilities Catalog, based on evidence of active exploitation. These types of vulnerabilities are a frequent attack vector for malicious cyber actors and pose significant risk to the federal enterprise. Note: to view the newly added vulnerability in the catalog, click on the arrow on the of the “Date Added to Catalog” column, which will sort by descending dates.

Binding Operational Directive (BOD) 22-01: Reducing the Significant Risk of Known Exploited Vulnerabilities established the Known Exploited Vulnerabilities Catalog as a living list of known CVEs that carry significant risk to the federal enterprise. BOD 22-01 requires FCEB agencies to remediate identified vulnerabilities by the due date to protect FCEB networks against active threats. See the BOD 22-01 Fact Sheet for more information.

Although BOD 22-01 only applies to FCEB agencies, CISA strongly urges all organizations to reduce their exposure to cyberattacks by prioritizing timely remediation of Catalog vulnerabilities as part of their vulnerability management practice. CISA will continue to add vulnerabilities to the Catalog that meet the meet the specified criteria.


May 10, 2022

Microsoft has released a security advisory to address a remote code execution vulnerability affecting Azure Data Factory and Azure Synapse Pipelines. A remote attacker could exploit this vulnerability to take control of an affected system.CISA encourages users and administrators to review Microsoft Advisory ADV220001 for more information and to apply the necessary updates.


2021 Top Routinely Exploited Vulnerabilities
April 27, 2022

CISA, the National Security Agency (NSA), the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Australian Cyber Security Centre (ACSC), the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security (CCCS), the New Zealand National Cyber Security Centre (NZ NCSC), and the United Kingdom’s National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC-UK)  have released a joint Cybersecurity Advisory that provides details on the top 15 Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVEs) routinely exploited by malicious cyber actors in 2021, as well as other CVEs frequently exploited.

CISA encourages users and administrators to review joint Cybersecurity Advisory: 2021 Top Routinely Exploited Vulnerabilities and apply the recommended mitigations to reduce the risk of compromise by malicious cyber actors.


CISA Releases Secure Cloud Business Applications (SCuBA) Guidance Documents for Public Comment
April 19, 2022

CISA has released draft versions of two guidance documents—along with a request for comment (RFC)—that are a part of the recently launched Secure Cloud Business Applications (SCuBA) project:

  • Secure Cloud Business Applications (SCuBA) Technical Reference Architecture (TRA)
  • Extensible Visibility Reference Framework (eVRF) Program Guidebook

The public comment period for the RFC guidance documents closes on May 19, 2022.

In accordance with Executive Order 14028, which is aimed at improving security for federal government networks, CISA’s SCuBA project aims to develop consistent, effective, modern, and manageable security that will help secure agency information assets stored within cloud operations.

CISA encourages interested parties to review the SCuBA documents and provide comment.
See CISA Blog: SCuBA? It means better visibility, standards, and security practices for government cloud for more information and for links to the RFC guidance documents.


North Korean State-Sponsored APT Targets Blockchain Companies
April 18, 2022

CISA,  the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and the U.S. Treasury Department have released a joint Cybersecurity Advisory (CSA) that details cyber threats associated with cryptocurrency thefts and tactics used by a North Korean state-sponsored advanced persistent threat (APT) actor known as the Lazarus Group.

CISA encourages organizations to review joint CSA: TraderTraitor: North Korean State-Sponsored APT Targets Blockchain Companies and apply the recommendations.


Microsoft Releases Advisory to Address Critical Remote Code Execution Vulnerability (CVE-2022-26809)
April 13, 2022

Microsoft has released an advisory to address CVE-2022-26809, a critical remote code execution vulnerability in Remote Procedure Call Runtime Library. A remote, unauthenticated attacker could exploit this vulnerability to take control of an affected system.

CISA encourages users and administrators to review Microsoft’s advisory and apply the recommended mitigations.


Mitigating Attacks Against Uninterruptable Power Supply Devices
March 29, 2022

CISA and the Department of Energy (DOE) are aware of threat actors gaining access to a variety of internet-connected uninterruptable power supply (UPS) devices, often through unchanged default usernames and passwords. Organizations can mitigate attacks against their UPS devices, which provide emergency power in a variety of applications when normal power sources are lost, by removing management interfaces from the internet.

Organizations can mitigate attacks against UPS devices by immediately removing management interfaces from the internet. Review CISA and DOE’s guidance on mitigating attacks against UPS devices for additional mitigations and information.


Vulnerability Summary for the Week of March 21, 2022
March 28, 2022

The CISA Vulnerability Bulletin provides a summary of new vulnerabilities that have been recorded by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) National Vulnerability Database (NVD) in the past week. NVD is sponsored by CISA. In some cases, the vulnerabilities in the bulletin may not yet have assigned CVSS scores. Please visit NVD for updated vulnerability entries, which include CVSS scores once they are available.

Vulnerabilities are based on the Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) vulnerability naming standard and are organized according to severity, determined by the Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) standard.


State-Sponsored Russian Cyber Actors Targeted Energy Sector from 2011 to 2018
March 24, 2022

CISA, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and the Department of Energy have released a joint Cybersecurity Advisory (CSA) detailing campaigns conducted by state-sponsored Russian cyber actors from 2011 to 2018 that targeted U.S. and international Energy Sector organizations. The CSA highlights historical tactics, techniques, and procedures as well as mitigations Energy Sector organizations can take now to protect their networks.

CISA encourages all critical infrastructure organizations to review joint CSA: Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures of Indicted State-Sponsored Russian Cyber Actors Targeting the Energy Sector and apply the recommendations. For more information on Russian state-sponsored malicious cyber activity, see CISA’s Russia Cyber Threat Overview and Advisories page.


FBI and FinCEN Release Advisory on AvosLocker Ransomware
March 22, 2022

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the Department of the Treasury’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) have released a joint Cybersecurity Advisory identifying indicators of compromise associated with AvosLocker ransomware. AvosLocker is a ransomware-as-a-service affiliate-based group that has targeted victims across multiple critical infrastructure sectors in the United States including, but not limited to, the Financial Services, Critical Manufacturing, and Government Facilities sectors.


FACT SHEET: Act Now to Protect Against Potential Cyberattacks
March 21, 2022

The Biden-Harris Administration has warned repeatedly about the potential for Russia to engage in malicious cyber activity against the United States in response to the unprecedented economic sanctions we have imposed. There is now evolving intelligence that Russia may be exploring options for potential cyberattacks.

The Administration has prioritized strengthening cybersecurity defenses to prepare our Nation for threats since day one. President Biden’s Executive Order is modernizing the Federal Government defenses and improving the security of widely-used technology. The President has launched public-private action plans to shore up the cybersecurity of the electricity, pipeline, and water sectors and has directed Departments and Agencies to use all existing government authorities to mandate new cybersecurity and network defense measures. Internationally, the Administration brought together more than 30 allies and partners to cooperate to detect and disrupt ransomware threats, rallied G7 countries to hold accountable nations who harbor ransomware criminals, and taken steps with partners and allies to publicly attribute malicious activity.

We accelerated our work in November of last year as Russian President Vladimir Putin escalated his aggression ahead of his further invasion of Ukraine with extensive briefings and advisories to U.S. businesses regarding potential threats and cybersecurity protections. The U.S. Government will continue our efforts to provide resources and tools to the private sector, including via CISA’s Shields-Up campaign and we will do everything in our power to defend the Nation and respond to cyberattacks. But the reality is that much of the Nation’s critical infrastructure is owned and operated by the private sector and the private sector must act to protect the critical services on which all Americans rely.

Read More


Bulletin (SB22-066): Vulnerability Summary for the Week of February 28, 2022
March 07, 2022

The CISA Vulnerability Bulletin provides a summary of new vulnerabilities that have been recorded by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) National Vulnerability Database (NVD) in the past week. NVD is sponsored by CISA. In some cases, the vulnerabilities in the bulletin may not yet have assigned CVSS scores. Please visit NVD for updated vulnerability entries, which include CVSS scores once they are available.

Vulnerabilities are based on the Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) vulnerability naming standard and are organized according to severity, determined by the Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) standard. The division of high, medium, and low severities correspond to the following scores:

  • High: vulnerabilities with a CVSS base score of 7.0–10.0
  • Medium: vulnerabilities with a CVSS base score of 4.0–6.9
  • Low: vulnerabilities with a CVSS base score of 0.0–3.9

Entries may include additional information provided by organizations and efforts sponsored by CISA. This information may include identifying information, values, definitions, and related links. Patch information is provided when available. Please note that some of the information in the bulletin is compiled from external, open-source reports and is not a direct result of CISA analysis.

Click here to see the list of all vulnerabilities.


CISA Adds 95 Known Exploited Vulnerabilities to Catalog
March 3, 2022

CISA has added 95 new vulnerabilities to its Known Exploited Vulnerabilities Catalog, based on evidence of active exploitation. These types of vulnerabilities are a frequent attack vector for malicious cyber actors and pose significant risk to the federal enterprise. Note: to view the newly added vulnerabilities in the catalog, click on the arrow on the of the “Date Added to Catalog” column, which will sort by descending dates.

Binding Operational Directive (BOD) 22-01: Reducing the Significant Risk of Known Exploited Vulnerabilities established the Known Exploited Vulnerabilities Catalog as a living list of known CVEs that carry significant risk to the federal enterprise. BOD 22-01 requires FCEB agencies to remediate identified vulnerabilities by the due date to protect FCEB networks against active threats. See the BOD 22-01 Fact Sheet for more information.

Although BOD 22-01 only applies to FCEB agencies, CISA strongly urges all organizations to reduce their exposure to cyberattacks by prioritizing timely remediation of Catalog vulnerabilities as part of their vulnerability management practice. CISA will continue to add vulnerabilities to the Catalog that meet the specified criteria.

Note: prioritizing software updates that address known exploited vulnerabilities is one of the actions CISA encourages as part of the recent Shields Up recommendations to all stakeholders. CISA appreciates the contributions of Joint Cyber Defense Collaborative (JCDC) partners to this recent addition to the catalog.


CISA Issues “Shields Up” Alert
February 16, 2022

Every organization in the United States is at risk from cyber threats that can disrupt essential services and potentially result in impacts to public safety. Over the past year, cyber incidents have impacted many companies, non-profits, and other organizations, large and small, across multiple sectors of the economy.

Notably, the Russian government has used cyber as a key component of their force projection over the last decade, including previously in Ukraine in the 2015 timeframe. The Russian government understands that disabling or destroying critical infrastructure—including power and communications—can augment pressure on a country’s government, military and population and accelerate their acceding to Russian objectives.

While there are not currently any specific credible threats to the U.S. homeland, we are mindful of the potential for the Russian government to consider escalating its destabilizing actions in ways that may impact others outside of Ukraine.

Based on this situation, CISA has been working closely with our critical infrastructure partners over the past several months to ensure awareness of potential threats—part of a paradigm shift from being reactive to being proactive.

CISA recommends all organizations—regardless of size—adopt a heightened posture when it comes to cybersecurity and protecting their most critical assets. Recommended actions include:

Reduce the likelihood of a damaging cyber intrusion

  • Validate that all remote access to the organization’s network and privileged or administrative access requires multi-factor authentication.
  • Ensure that software is up to date, prioritizing updates that address known exploited vulnerabilities identified by CISA.
  • Confirm that the organization’s IT personnel have disabled all ports and protocols that are not essential for business purposes.
  • If the organization is using cloud services, ensure that IT personnel have reviewed and implemented strong controls outlined in CISA’s guidance.
  • Sign up for CISA’s free cyber hygiene services, including vulnerability scanning, to help reduce exposure to threats.

READ MORE HERE


Vulnerability Summary for the Week of February 7, 2022
Original release date: February 14, 2022

The CISA Vulnerability Bulletin provides a summary of new vulnerabilities that have been recorded by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) National Vulnerability Database (NVD) in the past week. NVD is sponsored by CISA. In some cases, the vulnerabilities in the bulletin may not yet have assigned CVSS scores. Please visit NVD for updated vulnerability entries, which include CVSS scores once they are available.

Vulnerabilities are based on the Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) vulnerability naming standard and are organized according to severity, determined by the Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) standard. The division of high, medium, and low severities correspond to the following scores:

  • High: vulnerabilities with a CVSS base score of 7.0–10.0
  • Medium: vulnerabilities with a CVSS base score of 4.0–6.9
  • Low: vulnerabilities with a CVSS base score of 0.0–3.9

Entries may include additional information provided by organizations and efforts sponsored by CISA. This information may include identifying information, values, definitions, and related links. Patch information is provided when available. Please note that some of the information in the bulletin is compiled from external, open-source reports and is not a direct result of CISA analysis.

Click here to see the extensive list.


CISA Urges Organizations to Implement Immediate Cybersecurity Measures to Protect Against Potential Threats
January 18, 2022

In response to recent malicious cyber incidents in Ukraine—including the defacement of government websites and the presence of potentially destructive malware on Ukrainian systems—CISA has published CISA Insights: Implement Cybersecurity Measures Now to Protect Against Potential Critical Threats. The CISA Insights strongly urges leaders and network defenders to be on alert for malicious cyber activity and provides a checklist of concrete actions that every organization—regardless of sector or size—can take immediately to:

  • Reduce the likelihood of a damaging cyber intrusion,
  • Detect a potential intrusion,
  • Ensure the organization is prepared to respond if an intrusion occurs, and
  • Maximize the organization’s resilience to a destructive cyber incident.

CISA urges senior leaders and network defenders to review the CISA Insights and implement the cybersecurity measures on the checklist.


CISA, FBI, and NSA Release Cybersecurity Advisory on Russian Cyber Threats to U.S. Critical Infrastructure
January 11, 2022

CISA, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and the National Security Agency (NSA) have released a joint Cybersecurity Advisory (CSA) that provides an overview of Russian state-sponsored cyber operations, including commonly observed tactics, techniques, and procedures. The CSA also provides detection actions, incident response guidance, and mitigations. CISA, the FBI, and NSA are releasing the joint CSA to help the cybersecurity community reduce the risk presented by Russian state-sponsored cyber threats.

CISA, the FBI, and NSA encourage the cybersecurity community—especially critical infrastructure network defenders—to adopt a heightened state of awareness, conduct proactive threat hunting, and implement the mitigations identified in the joint CSA. CISA recommends network defenders review CISA’s Russia Cyber Threat Overview and Advisories page for more information on Russian state-sponsored malicious cyber activity. CISA recommends critical infrastructure leaders review CISA Insights: Preparing For and Mitigating Potential Cyber Threats for steps to proactively strengthen their organization’s operational resiliency against sophisticated threat actors, including nation-states and their proxies.


CISA Adds 15 Known Exploited Vulnerabilities to Catalog
January 10, 2022

CISA has added 15 new vulnerabilities to its Known Exploited Vulnerabilities Catalog, based on evidence that threat actors are actively exploiting the vulnerabilities listed in the table below. These types of vulnerabilities are a frequent attack vector for malicious cyber actors of all types and pose significant risk to the federal enterprise.

CVE Number CVE Title Remediation
Due Date
CVE-2021-22017 VMware vCenter Server Improper Access Control Vulnerability 1/24/2022
CVE-2021-36260 Hikvision Improper Input Validation Vulnerability 1/24/2022
CVE-2021-27860 FatPipe WARP, IPVPN, and MPVPN Privilege Escalation vulnerability 1/24/2022
CVE-2020-6572 Google Chrome prior to 81.0.4044.92 Use-After-Free Vulnerability 7/10/2022
CVE-2019-1458 Microsoft Win32K Elevation of Privilege Vulnerability 7/10/2022
CVE-2013-3900 Microsoft WinVerify Trust Function Remote Code Execution Vulnerability 7/10/2022
CVE-2019-2725 Oracle WebLogic Server, Injection Vulnerability 7/10/2022
CVE-2019-9670 Synacor Zimbra Collaboration Suite Improper Restriction of XML External Entity Reference Vulnerability 7/10/2022
CVE-2018-13382 Fortinet FortiOS and FortiProxy Improper Authorization Vulnerability 7/10/2022
CVE-2018-13383 Fortinet FortiOS and FortiProxy Improper Authorization Vulnerability 7/10/2022
CVE-2019-1579 Palo Alto Networks PAN-OS Remote Code Execution Vulnerability 7/10/2022
CVE-2019-10149 Exim Mail Transfer Agent (MTA) Improper Input Validation Vulnerability 7/10/2022
CVE-2015-7450 IBM WebSphere Application Server and Server Hy Server Hypervisor Edition Remote Code Execution Vulnerability 7/10/2022
CVE-2017-1000486 Primetek Primefaces Application Remote Code Execution Vulnerability 7/10/2022
CVE-2019-7609 Elastic Kibana Remote Code Execution Vulnerability 7/10/2022

Binding Operational Directive (BOD) 22-01: Reducing the Significant Risk of Known Exploited Vulnerabilities established the Known Exploited Vulnerabilities Catalog as a living list of known CVEs that carry significant risk to the federal enterprise. BOD 22-01 requires FCEB agencies to remediate identified vulnerabilities by the due date to protect FCEB networks against active threats. See the BOD 22-01 Fact Sheet for more information.

Although BOD 22-01 only applies to FCEB agencies, CISA strongly urges all organizations to reduce their exposure to cyberattacks by prioritizing timely remediation of Catalog vulnerabilities as part of their vulnerability management practice. CISA will continue to add vulnerabilities to the Catalog that meet the meet the specified criteria.